Dreamwatch

Mystery Fiction. True Paranormal.

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Dreams, Daydreams, Inspiration by Penny Goetjen

Dreams, Daydreams, Inspiration by Penny Goetjen

DreamWatch.com is all about dreams.

I’m happy to host mystery author Penny Goetjen on my personal blog. Here at Writings on the Wall, I write about whatever interests me at the time, could be about reading The Mueller Report, new blooms on an old houseplant, or observing a strange bug that landed in my driveway. When I learned Penny had completed the third book in her Precipice series, I was excited to know more because DreamWatch is all about dreams. Please join me in welcoming my guest Penny Goetjen. —Kat

Dreams

Dreams are a funny thing. We encounter them during late night slumber, when all we’re hoping for is a few hours of solid rest to ready ourselves for the coming day. Most people experience them, but dreams don’t always make sense. Some are so startling, we’re shaken to the core and swear we’ll never forget them. Dreams & DaydreamsOthers are fleeting and, although we try to remember the details, they seem to dissipate like a wisp of smoke from the tip of a cigarette. Many just leave us amused by the seemingly random pieces our sub-conscious pulled together.

There are professionals—dream interpreters—who claim to be able to explain the meaning of dreams but are steeped in controversy over whether there is any validity in their methods. Some offer to teach us how to interpret dreams ourselves, a sort of DIY psychological exercise. The desire to understand our elusive nighttime encounters goes back centuries to when there was a strong belief that dreams were a way of communicating with spirits. I happen to believe this does occur, although not as often as other types of dreams that are downright puzzling.

Daydreams

But where do daydreams fit into all of this? Are they similar enough in nature to be grouped in with night dreams? I would venture to say our more vivid daydreams could be similar in experience to the nighttime version and just as unsettling.

Inspiration

Murder On the Precipice

It was one such daydream in a fictional setting that sets into motion the events for Manhattan interior designer Elizabeth Pennington in Murder On the Precipice. It’s late on a Friday afternoon and her boss has just stepped out of the conference room so she’s alone in the quiet, gazing through the rain-splattered windows. As fatigue washes over her, she slips back to her childhood when she would climb the steps to the lighthouse and watch storms approach from inside the stalwart 100-year-old walls. Movement catches her eye on the breakwater. At first one, then a second figure struggles to keep from getting washed into the ocean by the waves churned up by the storm.

Startled by her boss returning to the conference room, Elizabeth has little time to ponder the meaning of the daydream. Was it simply her active imagination at work? A repressed memory?

As the story progresses, Elizabeth’s grandmother summons her to return to her childhood home—a quaint coastal inn in Pennington Point, Maine where a young female guest is missing, and the case is eerily similar to an unsolved disappearance years earlier when the family ran an all-girls school on the property. Elizabeth is determined to find the girl and save the inn from an elusive killer, but in her pursuit, she uncovers painful secrets that put into question everything she thought she knew about herself, her family, and her past. By the time the last page is turned, Elizabeth realizes the meaning of her daydream in the Manhattan conference room, high above the rain-soaked streets below.

Murder Beyond the Precipice

In Murder Beyond the Precipice, Elizabeth’s story continues when she receives an unexpected invitation to a wedding in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, up the coast from her family’s inn. She arrives unannounced at the celebrated estate-turned-inn to surprise a friend who works there, only to learn no one knows her whereabouts. Other disappearances soon follow and, in her quest for answers, Elizabeth stirs long-since-buried memories the locals endeavor to keep hidden, along with the scars left behind, and finds herself tangled in a trail of betrayal, deception, love lost, and murder.

Murder Returns to the Precipice

Murder Returns To The Precipice, book 3 of the Precipice series by Penny GoetjenWhen murder checks in, the inn’s dark past resurfaces.

In the highly-anticipated third novel in the trilogy, Murder Returns to the Precipice, to be released October 17, 2019, Elizabeth has returned to her family’s inn which she lovingly restored to its former New England charm after a powerful hurricane nearly wiped it off the map. The untimely death of a young female guest in the fitness center threatens to tarnish the inn’s re-opening and appears to be an accident, but when a second body is discovered, Elizabeth fears the inn’s dark past has resurfaced, yet remains steadfast in her quest to carry on her grandmother’s legacy as innkeeper—until the killer comes after her.

Murder Returns to the Precipice, to be released October 17, 2019

And to think, it all began late one rainy afternoon in New York City, lost in a daydream of a tragic, life-altering childhood event.

* * *

Penny Goetjen, mystery author

Penny Goetjen, author

Penny Goetjen, a national award-winning author, writes murder mysteries where the settings play as prominent a role as the engaging characters. A self-proclaimed eccentric known for writing late into the night, transfixed by the allure of flickering candlelight, Penny embraces the writing process, unaware what will confront her at the next turn. Fascinated with the paranormal, she weaves subtle and unexpected twists into her stories. It was her grandmother’s creaky, old house in Maine where she had her first paranormal experience. When her husband is asked how he feels about his wife writing murder mysteries, he answers with a wink, “I sleep with one eye open.”

Learn more about Penny and her writing on her website: https://pennygoetjen.com/

* * *

Thanks to Penny Goetjen for posting at DreamWatch.com on my personal blog, Writings on the Wall.

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What to Skim or Skip in the Mueller Report. Reading for the Rest of Us. Part 3

What to Skim or Skip in the Report.

Part 3 of a series: How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us.

Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election

Before reading What to Skim or Skip in the Mueller Report, you might want to check out Part 1. Why I read the Mueller Report and why everyone should.

I read the entire report, footnotes and all, and I found quite a few pages I could have skimmed or skipped. As I wrote in Part 1, I’m no one special, an everyday American like you, so my words might not pass a legal test. When I want facts, I trust no one. I check multiple sources. I couldn’t swallow the confusing contradictions.

My sense of duty compelled me to read the report and draw my own conclusions, as should you. Don’t believe me. Find out for yourself.

Reading the report is not as intimidating as you might think.

I admit when I heard 448 pages, I wondered how far I’d get, but I learned that actual reading was nowhere near that many pages. In this post I suggest which parts, in my opinion, you can skip to lighten your reading load. The Report consists of two distinct volumes. Read both or start by choosing one. I suggest skimming my previous post: Anatomy of the Mueller Report. Structure and Content. Part 2

Volume 1: What to read, skim or skip

Volume I describes the factual results of the Special Counsel’s investigation of Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election and its interactions with the Trump Campaign.

Russian Interference and the Trump Campaign.

Skip the Title and blank pages. Unless you’re looking for, or referring back to something specific, skip the 5-page Table of Contents. Skim the Introduction to Volume 1. 

Executive Summary to Volume 1 — These six pages are important. You have three choices: Skim it and proceed to Section 1, Read it and proceed to Section 1, or Read it and call it a day and proceed to Volume 2. I suggest you read it and keep going, because you should be hooked by the Summary.

  • Section I, The Special Counsel’s Investigation — describes the scope of the investigation. It’s only three pages so why not read them.

  • Section II, Russian “Active Measures” Social Media Campaign — describes the principal ways Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. A lot of the meat is here and should be read, it’s only 21 pages with about half the content redacted.

  • Section III, Russian Hacking and Dumping Operations — report of Russian interference continues. This section covers cyber thefts, hacks, leaks, drops and spearphishing. Here’s where stolen emails and WikiLeaks comes in, and so much more for 29 pages. A quick glance looks like 20-25% is redacted.

  • Section IV, Russian Government Links To and Contacts With the Trump Campaign — here we go to Trump Tower Moscow, Trump Tower Meeting, Republican National Convention and the change to the party platform, emails, notes, dirt and many of the characters we’ve come to know from news reports. This section is packed with the details about contacts between Russians and the Trump campaign and its associated individuals, with few redactions in 107 pages. The guts of Volume I is definitely worth reading.

  • Section V, Prosecution and Declination Decisions — heavily redacted, my guess is almost 30% of the 26 pages as illustrated below. Mueller Report, Vol-I, Sec-V, redacted pagesSection V summarizes Volume I’s conclusions — to prosecute or not to charge, and why. This section can be skimmed for the results, and much of it explains law that can be skipped unless that’s your thing.

Volume I is only 185 pages. Take out redactions (8-9 pages), footnotes (I wouldn’t), and legal stuff and it’s a whole lot less than an average novel.

Volume 2: What to read, skim or skip

Volume II addresses the President’s actions towards the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election and related matters, and his actions towards the Special Counsel’s investigation. Volume II separately states its framework and the considerations that guided that investigation.

Obstruction of Justice

Volume 2 is all about Obstruction of Justice and begins on page 208 of the Report. I figure about 170 reading pages. (There’s no reason you can’t read Vol. 2 before Vol. 1.)

Skip the Title and blank pages, and unless you’re looking for something specific, or referring back, skip the 3+ pages in the Table of Contents. Skim the Introduction to Volume 2. 

Executive Summary to Volume 2 — These six pages are important. You have three choices: Skim it and proceed to Section 1, Read it and proceed to Section 1, or Read it and call it a day. I suggest you read it and keep going, because you should be hooked.

  • Section I, Background Legal and Evidentiary Principles — as the title reads, this section explains legal framework and “considerations” of investigation and evidence. This is a tough read for us non-legal folks. Skim it or skip it. However, it’s helpful to understand the legal criteria that each act being investigated must meet: Obstructive act, Nexus to an official proceeding, and Intent.

  • Section II, Factual Results of the Obstruction Investigation — this is the guts, with point-by-point detail, heavy with footnotes and light on redactions. If Obstruction of Justice is what you came for, you’ll find it in this section. You might get by with only Overview, Evidence and Analysis of each but you’d miss the details. 163 pages.

  • Section III, Legal Defenses to the Application of Obstruction-of-Justice Statutes to the President — Ugh! This is all about statutes, case law, and legal talk. Tough reading that I would skip.

  • Section IV, Conclusion — one must-read paragraph. I’ll make it easy. Here it is:

    Because we determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment, we did not draw ultimate conclusions about the President’s conduct. The evidence we obtained about the President’s actions and intent presents difficult issues that would need to be resolved if we were making a traditional prosecutorial judgment. At the same time, if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state. Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, we are unable to reach that judgment. Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.

You’re almost done. Appendices close the deal.

Choose what piques your interest:

A: Letter — an image of the actual letter appointing the Special Counsel

B: Glossary — of Referenced Persons, Entities and Organizations, and an Index of Acronyms

C: Written Questions and Trump’s Answers — skip the Questions and go straight to the Responses beginning on page 427 (aka: C-11) where the questions are repeated.

D: Transferred, Referred, and Completed Cases — 6 pages, heavily redacted. Worth the read.

Congratulations! You did it. You are now one of only 3-10% of Americans who have read the Report. Be proud. Brag. You’ve earned your opinion.

***

Thanks for your interest in How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us
Read the report. You can do it. It’s free online right now. I read the PDF document at NPR (National Public Radio)

Listen to the report. A free serialized narrative podcast is online at LawfareBlog.com:

Introducing “The Report”: A Podcast Series from Lawfare

***

How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us

Thank you for your interest in this non-political how-to series.

Part 1: Why I read the Mueller Report and why everyone should.
Part 2: Anatomy of the Mueller Report. Structure and Content.
Part 3: What You Can Skim or Skip in the Mueller Report.

I plan to post this 4-part series around the time former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies in an open session of congress on Wednesday, July 24, 2019.

I offer no conclusions, political or otherwise. That’s my point. Read the report and form your own. I simply offer encouragement and based on my experience, I hope to make the reading easier—for the rest of us.

# # #

Anatomy of the Mueller Report. Structure and Content. Part 2

Anatomy of the Mueller Report.

Part 2 of a series: How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us.

Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election

Before reading Anatomy of the Mueller Report, you might want to check out Part 1. Why I read the Mueller Report and why everyone should.  I read the Mueller Report and offer several reasons why you, and every American, should too.

Structure and Content

The report is divided into two distinct Volumes. Read one or both—but read something. It’s not as intimidating as you might think.

Think of the volumes as two separate yet related parts reporting the results of investigating different aspects of wrongdoing: Volume I, Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible connections to the Trump campaign; and Volume II, possible actions of the the president to obstruct justice (interfere with the investigation).

The report explains itself this way, word for word, in the Introduction to Volume I:

The report on our investigation consists of two volumes:

Volume I describes the factual results of the Special Counsel’s investigation of Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election and its interactions with the Trump Campaign. Section I describes the scope of the investigation. Sections II and III describe the principal ways Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. Section IV describes links between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump Campaign. Section V sets forth the Special Counsel’s charging decisions.

Volume II addresses the President’s actions towards the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election and related matters, and his actions towards the Special Counsel’s investigation. Volume II separately states its framework and the considerations that guided that investigation.

Anatomy of the Mueller Report

Volume I begins on page 1 of 448 pages and is numbered page 1.

Volume II begins on page 208 of 448 pages though it is also numbered page 1.

There is no universal preface for both volumes.

Each Volume has its own:

  • Table of Contents
  • page numbering beginning with #1
  • Introduction to Volume
  • Executive Summary to Volume
  • a detailed report of the investigation with corroboration

Appendices A, B, C and D conclude the report.

Inside Volume I

Volume I details Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election in five sections:

  1. The Special Counsel’s Investigation
  2. Russian “Active Measures” Social Media Campaign
  3. Russian Hacking And Dumping Operations
  4. Russian Government Links To And Contacts With The Trump Campaign
  5. Prosecution and Declination Decisions

Most or all sections and subsections begin and end with introductory and summary paragraphs.

Table of Contents — Volume I outlines its contents and looks like this:

Mueller Report, Volume 1, Table of Contents

Inside Volume 2

Volume II begins on page 208 (of the 448 pages) and covers the Obstruction-of-Justice investigation in four sections filling 186 pages (though some are redacted and some are blank):

  1. The Special Counsel’s Investigation
  2. Factual Results of the Obstruction Investigation
  3. Legal Defenses to the Application of Obstruction-of-Justice Statutes to the President
  4. Conclusion

Table of Contents — Volume II outlines its contents and looks like this:

Mueller Report, Volume 2, Table of Contents

Anatomy of the Mueller Report. The rest of it for the rest of us: Footnotes, Redactions and Appendices.

Footnotes

More than two thousand footnotes provide additional notes, comments and tidbits; most are mundane, but some are juicy. I read them all. The image of Vol. I page 29 (below) illustrates a good example of typical footnotes. I added the yellow highlight to show the report text and its corresponding footnote. Read this sample and you’ll see how footnotes add context and enhance the story.

You’ll also see emails, tweets, Facebook ads, and more. Many refer to the exact message ID numbers: Footnote #45 on page 22 of Vol. I: See, e.g., Facebook ID 100011390466802 (Alex Anderson); Facebook ID 100009626173204 (Andrea Hansen); Facebook ID 100009728618427 (Gary Williams); Facebook ID 100013640043337 (Lakisha Richardson).

Redactions

The Department of Justice and Attorney General William Barr decided on redactions, which portions of the text that would be obscured by black out. Of the 448 pages, about one third had at least one redaction, including about a dozen pages entirely redacted.

You’ll see four categories of redactions. (My list is alphabetical.) Color-coded type against black defines each category:

  • Grand Jury, red type: information presented to a grand jury that cannot be made public (unless released by a judge)

  • Harm to Ongoing Matter (HOM), white type: information that if made public could compromise ongoing inquiries, investigations, court cases

  • Investigative Technique (IT), yellow type: classified information that would reveal intelligence-gathering methods or sources, or put someone’s life at risk

  • Personal Privacy (PP), green type: information that might unfairly damage the reputation or violate the privacy of individuals not central to the investigation (they may be under investigation though not charged)

A page with typical footnotes and redactions looks like this (page 29 of Volume I). I chose one random point and its corresponding footnote to highlight with yellow:

Mueller Report, Vol I, pg 29 example of typical footnotes and redactions

This page 29 is a light example and a clue to reading time. Don’t be scared off when you hear 448 pages, as illustrated, they’re not all full text pages like a novel (though I highly recommend reading novels).

Read my forthcoming post: Part 3, What You Can Skim or Skip in the Mueller Report (in my opinion, sorry Mr. Mueller). And read the report.

Appendices—all the extra stuff at the very end of the report

Appendix A: The Department of Justice Order No. 3915-2017  

The Appointment of Special Counsel to Investigate Russian Interference with the 2016 Presidential Election and Related Matters. Appendix A beginning on page 395, is simply the image of the actual letter appointing the Special Counsel, and signed by Acting Attorney General, Rod J. Rosenstein on 5/17/17.

Appendix B: Glossary

“The following glossary contains names and brief descriptions of individuals and entities referenced in the two volumes of this report. It is not intended to be comprehensive and is intended only to assist a reader in the reading the rest of the report.”

The Glossary includes three categories:

  1. Referenced Persons
  2. Entities and Organizations
  3. Index of Acronyms

Referenced Persons:

The Glossary appendix begins on page 401 and includes about 10 pages of alphabetically listed Referenced Persons and brief descriptions of who they are. Example:

Erchova, Lana (a/k/a Lana Alexander) Ex-wife of Dmitry Klokov who emailed Ivanka Trump to introduce Klokov to the Trump Campaign in the fall of 2015.

Entities and Organizations:

We’ve heard of the Kremlin and WikiLeaks, and they’re included. A list of lesser known Entities and Organizations fills two pages. Example:

Alfa-Bank Russia’s largest commercial bank, which is headed by Petr Aven.

Index of Acronyms:

We all know the FBI and NATO, but many more acronyms from across the globe riddle the report. An Index of Acronyms clears confusion. Examples:

FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation

FSB Russian Federal Security Service

Appendix C:  Written Questions to be Answered Under Oath by President Donald J. Trump

Introductory Note

“The President provided written responses through his personal counsel to questions submitted to him by the Special Counsel’s Office. We first explain the process that led to the submission of written questions and then attach the President’s responses.” 

Beginning on page 415 of the report, Appendix C includes the Special Counsel’s questions and Trump’s answers. This appendix has several blank pages and ends on page 440.

Appendix D: Special Counsel’s Office Transferred, Referred, and Completed Cases 

“This appendix identifies matters transferred or referred by the Special Counsel’s Office, as well as cases prosecuted by the Office that are now completed.”

Beginning on page 441 of the report, the 8-page Appendix D lists eleven case Transfers and their status, fourteen Referrals that are mostly redacted, and three Completed Prosecutions (at the time of the report’s completion).

***

Phew! That about covers the report’s structure and content. Easy. Thanks for your interest in the Anatomy of the Mueller Report.
Read the report. You can do it. It’s free online right now. I read the PDF document at NPR (National Public Radio)

Listen to the report. A free serialized narrative podcast is online at LawfareBlog.com:

Introducing “The Report”: A Podcast Series from Lawfare

***

How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us

Thank you for your interest in this non-political how-to series.

Part 1: Why I read the Mueller Report and why everyone should.
Part 2: Anatomy of the Mueller Report. Structure and Content.
Part 3: What You Can Skim or Skip in the Mueller Report.

I plan to post this 4-part series around the time former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies in an open session of congress on Wednesday, July 24, 2019.

I offer no conclusions, political or otherwise. That’s my point. Read the report and form your own. I simply offer encouragement and based on my experience, I hope to make the reading easier—for the rest of us.

# # #

How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us. Part 1

Part 1 of a series: Why I read the Mueller Report and why everyone should.

I’m no one special, an everyday American like you, so my words in common language might not pass a legal test. However, I am a news fanatic and a pit bull when researching what stirs my curiosity, or anything I read, hear or see that doesn’t feel quite right. When I want facts, I trust no one. I check multiple sources. My blog posts are my opinion and my understanding of facts as best as I can determine.

My sense of duty compelled me to read the Mueller report. I explain my reasons in this post. I hope to convince you that reading the report is not as intimidating as it seems. In future posts, I delve into the reports anatomy, and suggest what you can skim or skip to lighten the load (in my opinion). I begin at the beginning.

How did we get here?

Activities by Russian operatives and suspicious links to candidate Trump associates and campaign officials sparked a covert counterintelligence investigation by the FBI in the summer of 2016.

  • January and February 2017, several House and Senate committees probe Russian meddling.
  • March 20th on Capitol Hill, FBI Director James Comey confirms the bureau is investigating links between Russia and the Trump campaign.
  • May 3rd during a Senate hearing, Comey states he believes Russian meddling continues.
  • May 9th, Trump fires FBI Director James Comey.
  • May 17th, in addition to previous hearings on foreign agents and election meddling, Democratic lawmakers request memos from the White House regarding Trump’s interactions with Comey leading to the Director’s dismissal.
  • May 17th, The Department of Justice Order No. 3915-2017 calls for the Appointment of Special Counsel to Investigate Russian Interference with the 2016 Presidential Election and Related Matters.
  • Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appoints former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III to serve as Special Counsel and continue the FBI’s investigation.

The report on that investigation is now commonly known as the Mueller Report. (You can see and read the actual Order No. 3915-2017, it’s included in the Mueller Report as Appendix A.) 

What is the Mueller Report?

Report On The Investigation
Into Russian Interference In The
2016 Presidential Election

Phew! Even the title is a lot of reading. Stay with me.

Why I read the entire Mueller Report.

Yes, it’s true. I read the entire report, footnotes and all (don’t skip the footnotes). The day after the redacted report was released to the public on April 18, 2019, I downloaded a free PDF copy and began reading Volume I. It was easy to Google search and find it on NPR’s website (National Public Radio, Inc. because I trust them). Yes, the report is long at 448 pages because it had to be. It’s loaded with facts and the testimony of several sources for each point. I took a few weeks from reading for my brain to process the material before I dove into Volume 2. I finished reading the report on Memorial Day, 2019.

My reasons for reading the Mueller Report follow:

  • Our election was attacked by Russia, an adversarial government, and that’s important.
  • We’ve seen Russian election interference in other countries, and now they’ve messed with us with the intention of helping one candidate, hurting another, and dividing us.
  • Special Counsel (S.C.) Mueller and his skilled team worked diligently for two years on our behalf to uncover the truth about the Russian interference in our election. We owe it to them to read their report.
  • Mueller assembled an “A-Team” with specific expertise in: counterespionage, cyber crimes, national security, counterterrorism and counterintelligence investigations, campaign finance, fraud and foreign bribery, foreign lobbying law, money laundering, organized crime, fluent in Russian and Russia media, constitutional law and obstruction of justice—and more. They deserve to have their work read.
  • I felt it my patriotic duty as much as voting, it’s the very least we can do.
  • We paid for the report and I hate to waste money.
  • I’m no sheep. No one tells me what to think. I can read. Present the facts and I’ll form my conclusion—as should you.

Let me add one more reason: Basic human courtesy.

I can’t imagine (actually, I can) working on a project for two years, doing my best for content and accuracy and for my country, presenting it as asked, and the people say, “Nah, I don’t want to read it.”

I respect Robert S. Mueller III as a former Marine, lawyer, FBI Director, and Special Counsel for the U.S. Dept. of Justice. He wants us to read his report. He said so himself in a public statement on May 29th. I couldn’t agree more.

Reading the report isn’t as intimidating as you might think. Imagine how proud you’ll be when you’re done, knowing you did the right thing. We owe it our country, and to ourselves to know the facts.

Where to find your very own copy of the Mueller Report.

Ha! Where can’t you find it. Search on Google for “free download of Mueller Report” and you’ll get 35 million results. Take your pick. Read it online or download a PDF from a legitimate, trusted website.

The Mueller Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election

I found my free, “no-frills” Original Document (PDF) on NPR’s website. Numerous “frilled” versions in paperback and hardcover books are available from most booksellers, and range in price from Free to  $9.99 to $19.99 and up. Kindle, e-book, large print, audio book. Some advertise extra comment and analysis.

Here’s a link to the plain redacted version from the U.S. Dept. of Justice, Mueller Report.

Can’t wait to get started?

By now I imagine, you can hardly wait to dig in and are tempted to peek at summaries. Go right ahead because those summaries will pique your interest and before you know it you’ll have read the Mueller Report. You’ll find it surprisingly readable, especially for a government document. Trust me, you’ve read worse. The report’s organization and detail impressed me; and I found the flawless grammar and punctuation to be refreshing.

Some say the report reads like a novel. As an author who writes actually novels, I beg to differ. The prose lacks the emotion of a mystery or thriller (emotion comes later in the form of frustration, outrage and anger). The report is definitely plot-worthy of a political or mobster thriller with an impressive cast of unsavory, cooperating, and heroic characters.

***

Thanks for your interest in How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us
Read the report. You can do it. It’s free online right now. I read the PDF document at NPR (National Public Radio)

Listen to the report. A free serialized narrative podcast is online at LawfareBlog.com:

Introducing “The Report”: A Podcast Series from Lawfare

***

How to Read the Mueller Report: A Primer for the Rest of Us

Thank you for your interest in this non-political how-to series.

Part 1: Why I read the Mueller Report and why everyone should.
Part 2: Anatomy of the Mueller Report. Structure and Content.
Part 3: What You Can Skim or Skip in the Mueller Report.

I plan to post this 4-part series around the time former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies in an open session of congress on Wednesday, July 24, 2019.

I offer no conclusions, political or otherwise. That’s my point. Read the report and form your own. I simply offer encouragement and based on my experience, I hope to make the reading easier—for the rest of us.

# # #

Nature Teaches by Judith Dreyer

Judith Dreyer, BSN, RN, MS, author and speaker

Nature Teaches by Judith Dreyer

Nature teaches with surprising results. I extend a warm welcome to Judith Dreyer, MS, BSN, author and speaker who also offers a Dream Navigation, Online Class. Judith shares personal experience of connecting to nature in this world—and among spirits.

Virtually all native cultures that have survived without fouling their nests have acknowledged that nature knows best, and have had the humility to ask the bears and wolves and ravens and redwoods for guidance.

— Janine Benyus, Biomimicry Institute

Nature teaches and I wanted to know “the woods” and how to move within the forest and meet creatures unafraid. I knew of Tom Brown Jr.’s Tracking School, and as an herbalist I was especially interested in his knowledge of edible plants.

Fate steps in

Through a series of synchronistic events and encounters I heard of a wilderness school in Maine run by one of Tom Brown Jr.’s students. I had enjoyed one of his awareness workshops so I enrolled in Basic Skills week to be held that spring in the deep forests of central Maine.

Our small group slept in a tipi and practiced the skills needed for two days of hiking and camping under the stars. Living so close to the land in respect and love for the earth heightened my senses, and I found myself walking in two worlds – the physical and the world of spirit. Spring colors intensified. The air of spring was cool and clarifying. We followed the tracks of deer and moose. The connection to all living things pervaded my bones. And I dreamed.

Return to everyday life

When I returned home I found it difficult to be indoors. I was also exhausted. While it was a terrific experience, the new sights and sounds of the forest had kept me awake and that week had taken a physical toll. I needed to rest and replenish. Once home, when I found myself in the woods where nature teaches, I practiced seeing with soft eyes and staying grounded.

The work process of Dream Navigation

I am a dreamer. In the aboriginal sense, everything is part of the Dreamtime. There is no separation. In the Mohawk tradition, for example, you follow the energy of the dream – if you dream of getting a massage you go out and get a massage in the waking state. It is this understanding of no separation that I try to bring into my everyday life. Shortly after I returned from the Basic Skills week, I had a dream. I teach dream work and I followed that same process of recording the dream:

Dream Navigation 

Step 1: Record the Dream

The Dream: I had a sense of being with the head instructor from the wilderness school. We were working on a more difficult tracking exercise, at least for me. As I looked into the forest clearing I saw deer that shifted into a group of people – several men and one woman – doing a specific toe walk. They would put the ball of the foot down and then lift the heel quickly and gently from the ground. They were wearing moccasins. The woman was dressed like a dancer wearing black leotards and a black skirt, her hair was tied in a bun like a ballerina. Men surrounded her on three sides. They toe-walked in unison. I “felt” as if I was given a message and a gift by the deer people. They were showing me a specific walk that would help to camouflage a group walking in the woods if everyone did this together.

How did I feel when I woke up?: I felt elated, light-hearted, and I thought seeing deer shift into human form was pretty cool.

Reality Check: I did not know this form of walking in the woods. I did not experience any contact with deer on my walks during the day.

Action: I wrote to the Wilderness School for verification. I was told that yes, in fact, there is a deer walk used in stalking and tracking in the forest. I was encouraged to practice the walk as given to me in the dream.

Nature teaches with a deer in the woods

About a week later I found myself on a local trail in a little preserve I had not visited recently. The main trail leads away from a small pond into a wooded area that meets a stream. The sound of rushing water soothed me so I sat on a stump to listen. This gray, early spring day was overcast and chilly. Suddenly I caught sight of two deer. They bolted out of a dense thicket 100 to 200 feet away and circled around me, two or three times. Surprised and in awe of these beautiful creatures, I sat still and willed myself to become part of the pattern of the woods and to observe.

deer in forestOne of the deer stopped about 50 feet away. She looked around. Eventually she bobbed her head as she pawed the ground. As she bobbed her head, I blinked my eyes and in my heart, I silently told her that I was here as her sister. I came to “do no harm” as my elders often advised. My eyes were the only part of me that moved. Nature teaches. Did she have a message?

I sensed she knew I was not part of the normal pattern of these woods. She turned. Her flanks quivered as if she was nervous or stressed. Then, she took deep breaths and let the air out with force from her nostrils. The sound was similar to a horse only there was no whinny. As I watched her leave, I had the sense she was showing me a useful breathing technique.

Nature teaches

That spring, as I explored the forest more deeply, I experienced a shift in my energy. Some know it as Kundalini. All I can say is that it was beautifully inspiring, very powerful, and it affected my heart chakra. It was not easy handling the Kundalini power surge. But, I had received a gift from that creature in these woods—an effective breathing technique to relieve pressure I could feel in my heart if I was anxious. I tried it and followed this pattern over the next few days along with the toe-walking step from the dream. I felt my strength build.

These two events occurred within a week of each other, delivering messages from the deer. Both helped restore my health and energy. Both were wonderful gifts that came from connecting with the deer – one in the dreaming state, the other in the forest. Neither from books. The Dreamtime is all-inclusive. All of our experiences contribute to our deep knowing. We are not separate from Nature so if and when we pay attention she offers solutions and inspiration.

Dream proved true

Later on, in the fall of that year, I attended a workshop for dreamers given by a dream shaman. One of the participants was a member of an ensemble that performed a deer dance that dates back to the 1100s in Europe.

  • The deer dance is enacted by a group of men acting as the deer.
  • They walk using the ball of the foot and gently lifting their heels.
  • There is only one woman involved.

* * *

At the Garden's Gate by Judith DreyerJudith Dreyer, BSN, RN, MS, received degrees in Nursing and Nutrition Science. She has taught at Western State Connecticut State University and focuses on holistic health including Western-based herbalism.

She is the author of AT THE GARDEN’S GATE.

Her website and blog can be found at www.JudithDreyer.com.

Podcast series Holistic Nature of Us is available on Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Google Music Play and her website.

* * *

Thanks to Judith Dreyer for posting on my personal blog, Writings on the Wall. DreamWatch True Paranormal Blog has added Judith’s “Deer Dance Premonition Dream” to our Personal Premonitions archive because the dream foresaw both the need to use the breathing technique to “feel stronger” and of seeing the Deer Dance at the Fall workshop, as well as the action and results that happened in future months.

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Coral. Color of the Year 2019. A mystery author’s home decor.

Coral. Color of the Year 2019. Turns out my home decor loves Coral.

Following and setting trends in a mystery author’s home.

When I first read coral was color of the year, a bit of hesitation hit. My first thought was, “Oh, no!” No coral blouse, sweater or dress because coral does not agree with my skin tone. I liked the color well enough—on others—and around the house.

I think of coral as a human color, maybe because it seems to be in same family as flesh, or something edible like fish or fruit. Blue wouldn’t be the same.

I didn’t want to be left out of the prevailing color trend, so I scanned my home and discovered that I lived with plenty of coral, enough to keep me current in home decor circles. Here’s what I found.

Coral pottery arrangement on bookcase

Pictured are two of Ryan Dolan’s Raku Saggar Fired Vessels – Handmade Wheel Thrown Pottery – from Dolan Clay Studio.  See many more samples on his Etsy shop page. And he’s got a fascinating video about the Raku process on YouTube. When I look at these I see fantasy landscapes that might cover distant moons, and every one is unique due to the process. So let’s talk color-specifics.

Coral. Not any coral will do.

Coca-Cola and Target are unmistakably red. Facebook and Walmart use blue. Think of Starbucks green, and who doesn’t associate UPS with brown. Caterpillar yellow and John Deere green. Not any red, blue or green will do, these brand identities require a specific color match to printing inks and more for brand consistency across the globe.

In a former career as an advertising Art Director and Graphic Designer I used the Pantone Matching System (PMS) everyday. For those who aren’t familiar, Pantone was the standard for matching color by its assigned number. My swatch book was never far from my desk.

Coral in the Turkish carpet.

When I wasn’t working, I was fortunate enough to travel. Pictured here is the center motif of a handmade wool carpet, a souvenir from Cappadocia, Turkey.

Home Decor: Handmade carpet from Cappadocia, Turkey

So there you have it. You don’t have to wear a color to live with and enjoy it.

Announcing the Pantone Color of the Year 2019: PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral

Described as a vibrant, yet mellow coral with a golden undertone that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge.

View Past Colors of the Year and learn about Color Intelligence, the Color of the Year selection process, and the Pantone Color Institute™ at Pantone.com

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Precipice series author Penny Goetjen in conversation

Penny Goetjen, Author of the Precipice series

Penny Goetjen, author of the Precipice series

Welcome to mystery author Penny Goetjen who is about to launch her new book Murder beyond the Precipice.

Please tell us about the newest book in the Precipice series.

I’m thrilled to say that Murder beyond the Precipice (MBTP) is available for pre-order on Amazon and will be released October 11th.

The story is set in a cozy harbor town on the coast of Maine and is the sequel to Murder on the Precipice that came out last fall.

Elizabeth Pennington, who is an interior designer in Manhattan, is the female protagonist in the Precipice series. After receiving an unexpected wedding invitation, she returns to the coast of Maine to stay at the Livingston Estate-turned inn. But as Elizabeth learns, the Livingston family is no stranger to tragedy:

Losing both parents at a young age in what authorities ruled an accident, Lucretia Livingston, the sole heir to the estate, is left to pick up the pieces. But many locals question the circumstances surrounding their deaths and if the family’s wealth was an irresistibly seductive motive for crossing the line. In her search for answers, Elizabeth becomes tangled in a tortured trail of deception, betrayal, love lost and murder, stirring buried memories that locals endeavor to keep secret, along with the scars left behind.

What new work keeps you busy?

I love the idea of something new. There’s nothing more exciting than a blank page at the onset of a new project. I never know where it will take me. How exciting is that?! Now that the second Precipice book will be out, I’m working to wrap up the rough draft of the third and final book in the series, Murder Returns to the Precipice, which will be out next year. Then I will get back to writing the sequel to The Empty Chair ~ Murder in the Caribbean.

Do you write yourself into your books?

They say there’s a little bit of the author in each character she writes—which, of course, can be terrifying depending on the character. I don’t consciously create characters modeled after myself but of all of them so far, Elizabeth Pennington in the Precipice series is most like me—or rather, like me when I was in my twenties—young, a bit naïve, striving for lofty goals. Okay, maybe a lot naïve.

With which of your book characters do you most enjoy spending time? Why?

I would have to say Olivia, the female protagonist in The Empty Chair. Not to detract from Elizabeth in the Precipice series, but Olivia is far braver than I could ever be and spends more time in the turquoise tropical waters on the island of St. Thomas (U.S.V.I) than I could ever dream to. So I enjoy being with her. Plus she hangs out with a good looking, ruggedly handsome guy, and that’s usually not a bad thing. 😉 So I look forward to getting back to writing the sequel to The Empty Chair to see where her adventures take her next.

Murder beyond the PrecipiceWhat did you edit out of this book?

I have a tendency to go into a lot of details about a location—particularly if I’m fond of it. MBTP takes place in Boothbay Harbor, Maine which is near and dear to my heart, so I went on a bit describing what it looks like and the highlights of the quaint harbor town. When I went back to reread my rough draft, I realized it was probably more than most readers cared to know and carved away the excess, hopefully leaving just enough so you get a feel for the bustling little town without overkill.



If you weren’t writing, in what other passion would you be immersed?

I’ve always thought it would be fun to travel and report on my escapades—in a column or on a TV show. Something along the lines of Samantha Brown on Travel Channel. But if not that, I probably would have ended up chasing ghosts. I’ve also always liked the idea of working at an airport—particularly the person with the lighted wands who directs huge planes in and out of their gates. Such power!

Let’s get personal …

Penny, I’ve got a few questions that have little to do with writing, so let’s get personal. Please indulge my curiosity. As you know, I’m interested in several paranormal subjects and I understand you’ve had some interesting experiences.

Can you tell our readers about your paranormal experience? How old were you? What happened?

I was in college. Between my junior and senior years …

Read Penny’s post titled: Creaky Old House of Ghosts on the DreamWatch True Paranormal Blog



If your life were a movie would it be a drama, comedy, romance, action, or science fiction?

Ha! I’m sure my husband would say drama. I’d like to think it’s more of a comedic romance. But if I take a good look back over the years, I’d have to say it had all three. While raising three children, there was plenty of drama with health scares tossed in here and there, but with plenty of comedy, too. When things get bad, your sense of humor is your saving grace. And since we celebrated our 33rd wedding anniversary earlier this year, you now there’s a little romance in there as well!

If you had a time machine, which time period in the past or future would you visit?

I wouldn’t want to go into the future. Honestly, what lies ahead scares me—what our children and grandchildren are going to face. I’d rather go back in time, but not too far. I like my modern conveniences. An ideal decade would be the fifties. Who doesn’t love poodle skirts and saddle shoes, drive-ins and malt shops with jukeboxes playing? I’m a huge fan of Happy Days and the movie Grease. I think I’d feel quite comfortable there.

What’s your favorite material object that you already own?

If you’d asked me a few weeks ago, I would have had a different answer. But after just evacuating ahead of a major hurricane, material objects suddenly have lost their luster. As we were pulling out of the driveway, leaving the shuttered house behind, I asked myself if I’d remembered everything important. Since my precious family was in the car with me and my computer (for writing) was tucked at my feet, I knew I had everything I needed. Of the material objects I had with me, my favorite had to be my rings—engagement, wedding, and anniversary—because no matter what happened to the house and all the material objects inside, all that mattered was the safety and well-being of my husband and children (and, of course, our two pups).

What’s your favorite restaurant meal?

Honey, any meal I don’t have to cook is a favorite meal of mine! But in a restaurant, I have an incredible glorious array of delectable items to choose from. What would my favorite be? Definitely Italian. More specifically chicken parm. It’s comfort food for me. And usually they give you so much food, there’s plenty left over so I get to enjoy it again for lunch the next day. 😉



Name one thing that drives you crazy.

Only one thing?! Okay, well, the first thing that comes to mind is when people talk much louder than they need to. I know that probably sounds a bit silly, but the older I get, the more I prefer quiet than a lot of noise. Writers tend to enjoy a peaceful corner with their keyboard. Maybe it was all the concerts I went to when I was younger—although I do still enjoy a good country concert.

What’s the one modern convenience you can’t live without?

Electricity. Maybe that’s cheating because it covers so many things. But I just love to have hot water for a shower (I’m not a camper) and heat when it’s cold outside. So if it is cheating to say electricity, then my answer is my cell phone. I know we used to live without them, not knowing we were missing out on anything. But now that we know, I really would have a tough time living without it. It’s how I stay in touch with family and friends. I also jot down thoughts that float through my head that relate to my writing. I have hundreds of pages of notes on my cell.

Where was the farthest you’ve traveled?

Aruba. That wasn’t the original plan, though. We were supposed to visit our son who was studying abroad in Spain during his junior year of college. Unfortunately it was the spring of 2010 when the Icelandic volcano was erupting and disrupting air travel. We got to JFK only to find out our flight was the first to be cancelled because of volcanic activity and the ash it was spewing across Europe. While we were sad to miss seeing our son, we tried to make the best of it and quickly rebooked our trip. After all, we were packed for a warm climate (the Mediterranean). Why not go somewhere else warm? Aruba it was.

What is the scariest thing you’ve done for fun?

My first thought was scuba diving in Jamaica, but then I remembered one of my kids giving me a shove off a zip line platform at the top of Crown Mountain on St. Thomas. Absolutely terrifying. But once at the top, there was no other way down. Killer views though!

What is your favorite part of your day?

Although I wouldn’t say I’m a morning person, I love the first part of the day because the possibilities of what the rest of the day will bring are endless. I like waking up while it’s still dark outside and no one else in the house is awake. I tiptoe out of our bedroom, trying not to disturb the dogs, and head downstairs to find my computer. There’s something magical about delving into whatever story I’m working on, in the still of the early hour, with only dim light from a solitary lamp to keep me company. I find myself transported to a different place.

Did we miss anything? Something you want to share with our readers?

If your readers are in Connecticut, please accept my invitation:
  • EVENT: Murder Beyond the Precipice Launch
  • DATE: October 11, 2018
  • TIME: 7:00 PM
  • VENUE: Simsbury Public Library, Friends of the Simsbury Library Program Room
  • LOCATION: 725 Hopmeadow Street, Simsbury CT
  • Admission is free and includes a giveaway.
  • Refreshments will be served.

***

Thanks for joining me at Writings on the Wall. Good luck with your new book.

Connect with Penny Goetjen:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Goodreads

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Common birds saga. Part One. The early days of nests.

Common birds saga. Part One:

The Birds. How I became their beloved.

The Common Birds Saga began long ago, when I first moved into my house. No birds lived and bred in the rafters of the carport though evidence suggested previous owners had discouraged settlement. Screening material blocked access to safe recesses. Misshapen and misfitted boards formed a haphazard barrier to nesting spots deep behind sideboards.

One day a bird flew in. “How cute.”

The bird, a common bird, a little sparrow all alone, perched on a beam and watched me standing in the side doorway that opened to the carport. There we were on opposite walls, peering over my Ford Focus. It occurred to me that we were doing exactly the same thing. The bird watching me, I watching the bird. She’d tilt her head, I’d tilt mine. I’d lift my arm, she’d raise her wing. We became pals.

She built a beautiful nest (I’m guessing about that) and laid her eggs. Soon the little ones were chirping for food and she’d fly in and and out, in and out from dawn till dusk. The cycle continued for years. Some nests were tidier than others, I could tell by the debris hanging or falling from above. I often wondered if the nest-builder was the same mama bird with whom I had so sweetly bonded.

Only a few times did I find a newborn nestling, fallen or pushed off the cliff. I’d try to leave the body where it landed and let nature (aka: the neighbor’s cat) take its course, but the idea of that poor mother bird seeing her baby on the pavement became too sad for me to endure for long. I’d scoop the body into a dustpan and hide it under the leaves of a daylily plant, out of mom’s sight, but not out of reach for the neighbor’s cat.

Beloved of the birds. A legend is born.

One day a distress cry shattered the quiet of my suburban neighborhood. At first I dismissed it, having learned enough bird language to distinguish between hungry kids; or squawks warning of cats, predator birds, or me. The cry was too persistent to ignore. I peeked outside and didn’t see any obvious threat. Yet the bird still wailed.

I found the location, but with the distance and the darkness of the high corner, I couldn’t see what was the cause of this bird’s alarm. I thought I saw slight movement, I squinted. Didn’t help. So I grabbed a flashlight and my eyeglasses and inched closer.

“Oh my gosh! Poor little bird.” How I became their beloved.

A large splinter of wood above the nest’s entry had slipped down and onto the mother bird’s neck, its little head poking out from the crack as if locked in a medieval pillory, or worse—a guillotine. The bird is trapped. I must do something. The bird wiggled and snapped its head, eyes wide as I approached. You can imagine the fear and panic of not understanding what danger might happen next—and the bird was freaking out, too.

I grabbed a long snow scrapper with a brush at one end. As I closed in, I comforted the creature, speaking in a quiet, soft voice. “Don’t be scared. I’ll save you. Be calm. It’s almost over.”

I wedged the snow brush underneath the loose splinter and eased it up. “Be free.” The bird flew away faster than an F-15.

For days, the bird flock spoke of me (tweeted about me)—Protector. Hero. Champion. “I am legend.”

That one family had been enjoyable to observe, the common birds enhanced this author’s life. But those joyous years of nest building, daring flight patterns, and bird songs were about to take a dark turn.

Common Birds Saga, Part Two will be posted sometime in the future.

# # #

Full-length fiction with plenty of dark turns and nothing at all to do with this common birds saga: Asylum, a dark suspense saga.  Winner of IPNE Book Awards 2016 for Best Mystery.

Or see our Asylum page at DreamWatch Press for more buy links, reviews and endorsements, sample chapters, and more.

# # #

Thriller subplot idea. Downed bug or insect spy drone?

Unexpected fly-in lands a thriller idea in the driveway.

Thriller idea — There I was, minding my own business, when my sister and brother-in-law (secondary characters in my next book) pulled into the driveway to drop off a book (what else?). When I glanced down, something odd caught my eye. I bent to look closer. Couldn’t believe what I was seeing. A bug. Big. About three inches. Unlike any I’d ever seen. Its design—shape and coloring—made me think of a military transport plane.

My appreciation for visually compelling flora and fauna comes straight from my dad. Once when he was mowing the lawn, he spotted the most beautiful little snake that had ever crossed his path, and that would be sixty years of snake sightings. Unfortunately, he couldn’t react fast enough to stop the machine from running over the slithering beauty, a moment that haunted him with guilt, sorrow, and regret for the rest of his days. Twenty years passed and he never forgot that beautiful little guy.

Visual acuity serving the public for generations.

My entire family and I have a gift for keen visual observation. My sister used her talent to analyze crime statistics and connect criminal dots for a local police department. My brother’s skill served America in the U.S. Navy searching for Soviet subs during the Cold War. My daughter gained a reputation in fingerprint recognition for state police in their crime scene investigation unit, and my grandson aced his first Where’s Waldo? book.

A thriller idea at every turn.

I write fiction and compulsively edit and proofread, easily spotting that extra word space, unassigned font, or unintentional italicized word—not so much for public benefit, but hey, I’m the black-sheep-outlier, which by-the-way makes my novels intriguing with unexpected twists. My family sticks to facts. I prefer stretching facts, embellishing facts and making them more interesting. I don’t mind if imagination overrides.

Camouflage bug? Moth? Insect spy drone?So I’m looking at this bug and am relieved that it clings to life, though not moving fast. I run in for my camera. Now, my sister wants to get on her way and is getting more annoyed. She takes a quick look to humor me and drives away.

I dash inside my house, stash the book, and grab a camera with a telephoto lens. I don’t want my face getting too close to this thing in case it explodes.

Tiptoeing closer, I see the bug hasn’t moved, much.

Moth? Camouflage bug? Insect spy drone?

Hours pass and I’m still thinking about this bug. (My dad would be proud.) Is it stuck on its back? Should I flip it over? Place it on the grass? In the shade? Feed it a leaf? Take it to the vet? Will birds devour the poor, helpless thing?

  • I fantasize a noted entomologist will see this rare new species and name it after me.
  • Or a military intelligence service will send a unit to retrieve their experimental spy drone, obviously the victim of a bird collision. (A thriller idea)
  • Or I’m spending far too much time on this because Camo Moth is not so rare after all.

After a bit of Google searching, I learned the facts (my sister would be proud) about this insect thanks to BugGuide.net. It might be a Sphinx Moth: Eumorpha Pandorus or Pandora Sphinx. I like those names—Pandora and Sphinx—they conjure ancient, exotic, and mysterious images and ideas.

Woe is me.

I take my licks and reluctantly concede that Jacob Hübner, noted German entomologist beat me to it when around 1806 he identified this creature as Daphnis pandorus (so says Wikipedia).

A new dilemma. Pandora Sphinx or Spy Drone?

Now I’m torn, so I might use both in future novels. An Insect Spy Drone would fit nicely in my Premonition soon-to-be-series* of psychic thrillers featuring a reluctant psychic, her skeptical FBI brother, and his new boss, a legendary counterterrrorism agent.

But the Pandora Sphinx could work in a new contemporary mystery in which ancient writings are the only clue. Hmmm… I’m leaning toward writing both.

*Premonition of Terror began as a stand-alone thriller, but by the time I wrote the end, it begged for a sequel. And why not a prequel. I’ve recently re-read Premonition (for the zillionth time), sparking one thriller idea after another so we’re likely headed toward a Premonition trilogy.

***

Premonition of Terror, a psychic thriller by Kathryn OrzechPremonition of Terror

International threats strike close to home in this psychic thriller. How far would you go to prevent an attack on our homeland if no one believed you?

Premonition of Terror is available in print and e-book where books are sold. Details, reviews, and Buy links on this site at DreamWatch Press.

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Finding my way in a high-tech world.

Finding my way post originally published July 13, 2017. The content remains sound. 

Finding my way — Writing a first blog post can be intimidating. I’ll begin with gratitude to you—readers, writers, visitors, curiosity seekers, or lost in virtuality after clicking the wrong Google link. Perhaps fate brought you here. Welcome!

Lost in a high-tech world, but finding my way.

This new site’s been live for a month and I’m still putting meat on the bones. (By the end of this post you’ll know why food is on my mind.) I’ve been finding my way around WordPress, themes, plugins, and widgets. My typical day is uneventful, often more tech-geeky than I ever imagined. A month ago I didn’t know what a widget was, but I’m finding my way. Tonight I installed a link-checker plugin and I’ll soon add an email signup.

Today was a typical day in an author’s life—nothing to write home about—yet here I am. 

  • I began the day watering my four houseplants when I wondered which of us was older, probably me, but the Christmas cactus was a close second. Hey, wait a minute. The antique lamp is definitely older, but the rocks and fossils take the prize for being millions of years old. Phew! I feel younger already!
  • I had one brilliant idea that will manifest in mid-August, and that led me to thinking about the banner on my YouTube channel.

I assessed my pantry supplies.

No milk. No eggs. No orange juice. No Arizona Green Tea. No food. Only frozen hot dogs and stale bread. I should have gone to the market, but nooo … I re-sized the banner for my YouTube channel (it’s true, I got that far), packed and shipped Asylum to a book blogger, decisions I will regret in the morning when my stomach pangs for food. Fortunately, one English muffin remains edible and there’s plenty of coffee, so I’ll be okay. I’ll try to get to the market early morning, before the heat gets me. I’d better start on my grocery list. Over and out.

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